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WindTubes NGSS

  • WindTubes - pkg. of 4
    Item #: WIN-600
  • Assorted colors.
  • - +
  • WindTubes - roll of 250
    Item #: WIN-610B
  • All one color.
  • - +
Fantastic for teaching the properties of air!

Description

Who can build the tallest self-supporting structure with eight windtubes?

Fantastic for teaching the properties of air, Bernoulli's Principle, and even for building structures! WindTubes are like balloons that don't stretch. They are not elastic. About eight feet long and ten inches in diameter, they are huge! It takes as many as 70 breaths of air to fill a WindTube or as little as one breath if you use Bernoulli's Principle. It is amazing to watch -- even some magicians use them in their act. The illustrated instructions include over a dozen creative and educational activities that you can do with WindTubes. The inventor Doron Gazit suggests connecting them together with simple rubber bands to create space frames or even Buckminster Fuller structures.

Packs of four come assorted colors. Rolls of 250 are all one color. Sorry, no color choice.

Read more on our Blog - Bernoulli's Principle: a Lesson or Two Made Out of Thin Air

Download the MSDS of this product.

Video


Lesson Ideas

Download the pdf of this lesson!

Our favorite WindTube Demonstrations!

Tie off one end of your Windtube. Ask students to estimate how many breaths it takes to blow up the 8 foot tube... 15?... 20?... 40? Ask a student to inflate the tube. Count the number of breaths required. Next show your students that, using Bernoulli's Principle, you can inflate the tube with only a single breath!

HERE'S HOW: Have an assistant hold the closed end of your Windtube so it extends out horizontally. Hold the other end wide open. Keeping your mouth about 10 inches away from the opening, blow a fast stream of air into the center of the tube for a few seconds. As soon as your tube is full, close it tightly with your hand and twist it tight. With a little practice, you'll be an expert!

Once your Windtube is filled, you can tie it closed or deflate it to store until the next use.

HERE'S WHY: In 1738, Swiss physicist and mathematician, Daniel Bernoulli stated that as the velocity of a fluid (any gas or liquid that flows) increases, the pressure it exerts decreases. Fast moving air has a lower pressure than air that is not moving. The faster the air moves, the lower the pressure. Likewise, the fast stream of air moving from your mouth flowing into the Windtube has a lower pressure than the air outside the tube. Air from the room rushes into this low-pressure area within the windtube and helps to fill the Windtube.

Firefighters use Bernoulli's Principle to clear smoke by placing exhaust fans back from doorways, leaving a space. This draws more air (and smoke) from the room. Hot Air balloons are filled more quickly using the same technique.

Inflated Windtubes make great indoor and outdoor games. Make up your own challenges. How far can they be tossed? How long will they stay up?

Windtubes make great Art, Geometry and Engineering Projects

Windtubes can be made into sculptures, structures or even moving works of art. Doron Gazit calls it Windtube 'architecture'. We call it fun and educational. Just attach two #33 rubber bands together, and slip them over the ends of two Windtubes to connect them together. Then challenge your students...

Can you build a sculpture that moves in the wind?

Let your imagination run wild!

Which structure is more stable, a square, a pyramid or a tetrahedron?

How tall a structure can you make?

Windtubes can also be filled by holding them with the open end wide and running with them. Or, wave them up and down and 'scoop' air into them. Try holding them open and let the wind fill them.

History of the WindTube... This is the original Windtube™. It is an 8-foot long, 10-inch wide plastic bag that can be inflated like a balloon. Unlike Latex balloons, Windtubes do not have to stretch to inflate, so they are very easy to fill with air and, because they are NOT made from Latex, they don't pop unexpectedly. Doron Gazit first invented Windtubes in 1979 while a college student in Israel. He originally called them 'Wind Bags', but quickly changed to the more descriptive 'Windtube' name. In 1981, Doron introduced them to hundreds of children in New York City's Central Park. Educational Innovations, Inc. is pleased to now carry the original Windtube. They are twice as thick as similar reproductions and have been manufactured with a special additive that makes them even stronger.

CLASSROOM SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
Please keep Windtubes, and all plastic bags, away from babies and young children as they are a suffocation hazard. Do not use Windtubes anywhere small children might gain unsupervised access to them. Windtubes are not a floatation device.

TEACHERS PLEASE NOTE:
Demonstrations involving Windtubes placed between the tops of two tables in order to lift one is dangerous and, in our opinion, should not be attempted in the classroom environment. If one of the Windtubes should burst or otherwise deflate, the tables can slam together with great force, crushing the fingers of the individuals inflating the tubes. Furthermore, the tubes are round and, once inflated, can act as rollers allowing the top table to slide and crash to the floor unexpectedly.

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Reviews

4 reviews
Wind Tubes
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Mar 4, 2019
What great fun and the kids, as well as the adults, attending outreach events, are truly confused as to how we can fill the wind tubes in one breath while they require many more, if they can fill them at all. Even after showing how a table tennis ball can float on a stream of air generated by a hair dryer but will shoot rapidly through a plastic tube (cut from a fluorescent light plastic protector available at hardware stores). A great demonstration of Bernoulli's Principle! I've also been part of demonstration using these wind tubes to lift a table with a person standing on it. Four wind tubes are placed side by side on a flat table. A second table is turned upside down and laid on top of the wind tubes. An individual carefully climbs on top and stands in the center. Four people blow into the bags at. the same time, again and again, resulting in the upside down lifting the table with the person. One must be careful to keep their hands away so they do not get smashed by the tables. This shows how, by distributing the air pressure, the force per unit area is reduced and can be related to the air pressure in the tires of an automobile lifting the entire car off the ground. We have not. tried the other activities mentioned but we will soon. Everyone should have a set of these in their lab!
Kenneth Lyle
Owner Response: Note: Though we have seen many science teachers use the WindTubes this way, for safety reasons, Educational Innovations does not recommend having students stand on an inverted table with the WindTubes between the tables. Thanks for the great review, Dr. Lyle!

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I love these
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jun 10, 2016
I do the race between a boy student and myself. In 2 seconds, mine is fully inflated, and the audience is in shock. I teach the student how to perform this amazing feat in one breath, and all is well. Like it.
Mark Carter

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Cheapest price
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jun 9, 2013
This site has the lowest price for these. These are awesome for science!!!
Lynn

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Interesting with a nice WOW factor
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon May 17, 2012
I ordered these to demonstrate how the body inhales and exhales. Because it is for middle school, students don't know or easily understand Bernoulli's Principle yet. The included brochure was ok, but I would have liked a little more science information in it (I looked on the internet instead).
SuzyS

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NGSS

This product will support your students' understanding of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)*, as shown in the table below.

Elementary Middle School High School

K-2-ETS1-2

Students can use the Wind Tubes in an investigation to develop a simple sketch, drawing, or physical model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function as needed to solve a given problem.

K-2-ETS1-3

Students can use the Wind Tubes in an investigation to analyze data from tests of two objects designed to solve the same problem to compare the strengths and weaknesses of how each performs.

2PS1-1

Students can use the Wind Tubes in an investigation to plan and conduct an investigation to describe and classify different kinds of materials by their observable properties.

2-PS1-2
2-PS1-3

Students can use the Wind Tubes in an investigation to make observations to construct an evidence-based account of how an object made of a small set of pieces can be dissembled and made into a new object.

MS-ESS2-5

Students can use the Wind Tubes in an investigation to collect data to provide evidence for how the motions and complex interactions of air masses results in changes in weather conditions.

MS-ETS1-4

Students can use the Wind Tubes to develop a model to generate data for iterative testing and modifications of a proposed object, tool, or process such that an optimal design can be achieved.

HS-ESS2-4

Students can use the Wind Tubes in an investigation to model how variations in the flow of energy into and out of the Earth system result in changes in climate.

HS-ETS1-2

Students can use the Wind Tubes to design a solution to a complex real-world problem by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering.

Suggested Science Idea(s)

Fantastic for teaching the properties of air, Bernoulli's Principle. It takes as many as 70 breaths of air to fill a WindTube or as little as one breath if you use Bernoulli's Principle. The WindTube has a lower pressure than the air outside the tube. Air from the room rushes into this low-pressure area within the WindTube and helps to fill the WindTube.

Challenge students to build with specific parameters WindTubes are like balloons that don't stretch. They are not elastic. Students can build structures! Rubber bands can be used to attach the wind tubes Which structure is more stable, a square, a pyramid, or a tetrahedron? How tall a structure can you make? Can you build a sculpture that moves in the wind?

Students can use the illustrated instructions as a launching point for over a dozen creative and educational activities.

 

* NGSS is a registered trademark of Achieve. Neither Achieve nor the lead states and partners that developed the Next Generation Science Standards were involved in the production of, and do not endorse, this product.

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