Email icon

Static Snowstorm Kit NGSS

SKU #STC-160
Availability: In Stock
Qty.
Styrofoam pellets that react when the globe is statically charged. Perfect for demonstrating that like charges repel and unlike charges attract.

Description

Our Static Snowstorm Kit is a memorable hands-on science lesson AND a unique keepsake for your students! Fill each plastic globe with small Styrofoam pellets that react when the globe is statically charged. Perfect for demonstrating that like charges repel and unlike charges attract. Easy to assemble and impossible to forget! Includes six plastic globe ornaments with caps, an ample supply of Styrofoam pellets, and instructions.

Read more on our Blog - Teachable Moments with the Static Snowstorm

Video

Write a Review

Reviews

2 reviews
Great Product
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Apr 1, 2019
My pre-K science students loved these. I sent one home with each of them after we used the in class. Sent a copy of the instructions home for parents. My advice: don't put more than 1 TBS if the material into the globe.
Joan Wilce

Was this review helpful?

1   0

STEM Coordinator and Science Teacher
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Dec 6, 2018
I bought two of these to use with my ChemClub but the ornaments were so tiny and the amount of snow given so little that I decided to buy the big bag of pellets instead. I bought plastic fillable ornamets at a craft store that were much larger and easier to work with. I was very happy to get the directions though by ordering this kit! They were a God send.
Rose Davidson

Was this review helpful?

1   0

NGSS

This product will support your students' understanding of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)*, as shown in the table below.

*Not intended for use by children under 12 years of age.

*Teachers may choose to use this device for demonstration purposes only.

Elementary Middle School High School

2-PS1-1

Students can plan and conduct an investigation using the Static Snowstorm Kit in conjunction with other items to describe and classify different kinds of materials by their observable properties.

4-PS3-3

Students can use the Static Snowstorm Kit in an investigation to ask questions and predict outcomes about the changes in energy that occur when objects collide.

MS-PS3-2

Students can use the Static Snowstorm Kit to develop a model to describe the concept that when the arrangement of objects interacting at a distance changes, different amounts of potential energy are stored in the system.

HS-PS3-5

Students can use the Static Snowstorm Kit to model two objects interacting through static electric fields to illustrate the forces between objects and the changes in energy of the objects due to the interaction.

Suggested Science Idea(s)

2-PS1-1
4-PS3-3

Students can plan and conduct an investigation about static electricity. Use a variety of materials (like an inflated balloon, assorted fabrics, hair, etc.) to charge the spheres. Students can make observations and predictions about the observable properties. How does the collision of the spheres affect the static charge?

MS-PS3-2
HS-PS3-5

Students can use the Static Snowstorm Kit to explore static charge. Hold the Static Snowstorm Kit next to an electrostatic generator—one globe attracts the spheres into a tight group, the other repels them.

Encourage students to create a static charge on common objects and predict the movement of the spheres.

Students can experiment with different amounts of the Styrofoam in the globes.

Thread a 20 cm piece of string through each of the caps for two Static Snowstorms. Experiment with charging one globe and dangling it next to a non-charged globe by the threads. Charge both of the Static Snowstorm globes.

Students can suspend their Static Snowstorm next to the Static Electricity Electroscope for many interesting investigations of static charge transfer

 

* NGSS is a registered trademark of Achieve. Neither Achieve nor the lead states and partners that developed the Next Generation Science Standards were involved in the production of, and do not endorse, this product.

Q & A