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Centripetal Spinner NGSS

SKU #PHY-250
Availability: In Stock
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The prettiest demonstration of centripetal force we've ever seen!

Description

The prettiest demonstration of centripetal force and inertia we've ever seen! This perky, iridescent device reflects a dazzling rainbow as it spins. Twirl the stick and the thin ribbons spread into a bubble shape. The faster you spin, the wider the bubble becomes! It can be gently twisted by hand to make a delicate "flower" that neatly tucks itself into a tight ball. Endlessly fascinating! Can be easily tangled by young children.

Named by Evan Jones, retired Physics professor from Sierra College in Rocklin, CA.

"I have had fun with activities using the spinner. Such precise parts! Did you notice that the film bands reflect one color and transmit its complement? While the reflection is from blue to green (depending on angle of viewing) the transmission is red to yellow...nice lesson on interference. The spinner itself shows centripetal force and spinning it shows Newton's 2nd law and impulse." - Evan Jones

Read more on our Blog – Centripetally Yours!

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Reviews

14 reviews
Be careful
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Feb 13, 2018
Yes, you can't spin these very fast; the strands tangle easily.
Annie Eddy

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Bubblewand
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Sep 5, 2017
I got two and glad I did because if you spin to fast the strands will get tangled, the other works great and awesome illusion
Jeremiah

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Centripetal review
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jun 27, 2017
Very interesting tool for my grandchild.
Sian

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Neat toy
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Feb 5, 2016
Not the most sturdy, but for $4, that's to be expected. My 8th graders like it!
Renee

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GrahamcrackerA314
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jan 26, 2016
These were great for an introduction and viewing how the speed of rotation changes the radius. They did get some creases in them from some of the students being a little "too rough". I would purchase them again and forewarn my students about spinning them too fast.
Linette Graham

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Entertaining Spinner
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Dec 31, 2015
This little item is quite entertaining! Amazing how it folds back up into a flower petal. It still continues to mesmerize my kids. I didn't think it would last but a few minutes but here it is several weeks later.
Karen Scalf

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Grandma G
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Dec 28, 2015
the spinners were the favorite from the Christmas Stockings. Fun had by all.
Linda Gaither

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A
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Oct 8, 2015
Simply, for $3.95 you can't get a better teaching tool that creates and holds the kid's interest. Plus, it's just a lot of fun to play/teach/learn with! This isn't a "one trick pony". You can explore centripetal force (duh) along with other subjects e.g. inertia, light, color and more. My suggestion, purchase more than one... Best wishes....
Marty

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Endless Fun!
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Aug 27, 2015
Such a simple toy, yet well made and versatile. Buying 6 more, for adding whimsy to child gifts! Kids can untangle on their own, should a strand go awry.
Katherine

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Science Magic Class
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jul 3, 2015
During class, I showed this spinner and asked the students how it worked. The K-6th students were intrigued as they had just learned about top rotations...
Pat Smith

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Mesmerizing!
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jun 10, 2015
Bought one after seeing the video on your Facebook page. I didn't realize it could make so many different shapes! I plan to use this next year with my 6th and 7th graders. Lots of applications!
Fran Celentano

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Centripetal spinner
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jun 9, 2015
A bit expensive, but it has a satisfactory, clever design and does the job.
Ralph McGrew

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Simple and elegant
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jun 4, 2015
This was a hit with the students. A simple little tool. Added bonus is when you roll it back up into the small sphereshape it shipped in it looks like a small flower opening or closing. I will be getting more of these.
Gene curtiss

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great!
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon May 5, 2015
This is more 'fun' than 'physics' - but it is addictive fun - I gave it as a gift to top students young and old and they all found it awesome!
Dedra N Demaree

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NGSS

This product will support your students' understanding of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)*, as shown in the table below.

Elementary Middle School High School

1-PS4-2

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner to make observations to construct an evidence-based account that objects can be seen only when illuminated.

2-PS1-1

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner to plan and conduct an investigation to describe and classify different kinds of materials by their observable properties.

K-2-ETS1-2

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner to develop a simple sketch, drawing, or physical model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function as needed to solve a given problem.

4-PS4-2

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner to develop a model to describe that light reflecting from objects and entering the eye allows objects to be seen.

4-LS1-2

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner to use a model to describe that animals receive different types of information through their senses, process the information in their brain, and respond to the information in different ways.

K-PS2-1

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner in an investigation to compare the effects of different strengths or different directions of pushes and pulls on the motion of an object.

K-PS2-2

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner in an investigation to analyze data to determine if a design solution works as intended to change the speed or direction of an object with a push or a pull.

1-PS4-3

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner in an investigation to plan and conduct an investigation to determine the effect of placing objects made with different materials in the path of a beam of light.

2-PS1-1

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner in an investigation to plan and conduct an investigation to describe and classify different kinds of materials by their observable properties.

2-PS3-1

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner in an investigation to describe and classify different kinds of materials by their observable properties.

3-PS2-2

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner in an investigation to make observations and/or measurements of an object's motion to provide evidence that a pattern can be used to predict future motion.

3-PS3-1

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner to plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence of the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object.

4-PS3-1

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner in an investigation to gather evidence to construct an explanation relating the speed of an object to the energy of the object.

4-PS4-1

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner in an investigation to develop a model of waves to describe patterns in terms of amplitude and wavelength and that waves can cause objects to move.

MS-PS4-2

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner to develop and use a model to describe that waves are reflected, absorbed, or transmitted through various materials.

MS-LS1-8

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner to gather and synthesize information that sensory receptors respond to stimuli by sending messages to the brain for immediate storage as memories.

MS-ETS1-4

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner to develop a model to generate data for iterative testing.

MS-PS2-2

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner in an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object's motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object.

MS-PS3-1

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner as a concrete introduction and demonstration on mass and motion. Students can then construct and interpret graphical displays of data to describe the relationships of kinetic energy to the mass of an object and to the speed of an object.

MS-PS4-1

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner as a concrete model for mathematical representations to describe a simple model for waves that includes how the amplitude of a wave is related to the energy in the wave.

HS-PS4-3

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner to evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning behind the idea that electromagnetic radiation can be described either by a wave model or a particle model, and that for some situations, one model is more useful than the other.

HS-PS2-2

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner to demonstrate how mass and momentum affect motion. This can be transferred into mathematical representation to support the claim that the total momentum of a system of an object is conserved when there is no net force on the system.

HS-PS3-1

Students can use the Centripetal Spinner as a physical model in conjunction with a computational model to calculate the change in the energy of one component in a system when the change in energy of the other components.

Suggested Science Idea(s)

The Centripetal Spinner entices the student with its loopy and colorful patterns. The changes in speed and direction the user pushes and pulls on the stick, determine the shapes and the energy it produces.

Classroom demonstrations of: centripetal force, friction, gravity, inertia, and more are at your fingertips.

Persistence of Vision; when the eye and the brain work together to create an illusion of a whole image. This is demonstrated due to the spinning motion and the seemingly connection of the Mylar strips into a solid orbs or figure 8 images.

When the Centripetal Spinner is held in front of different colored backgrounds, an interesting investigation of light interference can be conducted.

It can be used at numerous grade levels as a concrete introduction into more abstract mathematical and physical science concepts.

An interesting element to introduce into the lessons and investigations is the use of the slow motion video option on many phones. The slow action will allow students to look more closely at the forces at work, shapes that are formed and changes that occur during an investigation. Students can utilize the stop action on the video to collect precise data/measurements or identify parts of a wave.

 

* NGSS is a registered trademark of Achieve. Neither Achieve nor the lead states and partners that developed the Next Generation Science Standards were involved in the production of, and do not endorse, this product.

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