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Mixture Separation Challenge NGSS

SKU #MIX-100
Availability: In Stock
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Students must develop a method for separating the plastic beads.

Description

Using only table salt and water, students are asked to develop a method for separating this mixture of four different small plastic beads. Advanced students can continue on to determine the density of each different polymer! The materials in this separation lab can be used over and over again, and because only polymer materials are used, cleanup is easy. Complete teacher instructions provided. Includes 230 g (0.5 lb) of mixture, enough for a class of 24 students working in pairs. Beakers not included. Colors may vary.

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7 reviews
Mixture Separation Challenge
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jul 14, 2015
Ordered this item for next school year but I have seen this one demonstrated at National Conferences and finally decided I needed one of my own.
Judith Denise Ashworth

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Great lab, but not recommended
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Nov 12, 2013
I think this is an excellent and fun lab. A few things before purchasing. 1. Consider that over time you will not be able to collect all the plastic (students do not have the ability to get all of them). 2. Students will not be able to mix all the salt causing a mixture of salt and plastic. You end up having to purchase the plastics again, which are clearly over priced for what you get. This item should be marked down considering that the plastic will be lost. Great lab, but impossible to keep the plastics around long enough.
Marco

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Lesson changed
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Oct 1, 2013
I have been successfully using the materials in the lesson for years - with the blue and YELLOW beads. I recently purchased 2 more sets that had RED and blue. I cannot use the red beads in the protocol I have - they WILL NOT float at the same density of salt water. In fact, I have not yet been able to make them float. Please tell me I can purchase some of the yellow beads. Pat Tellinghuisen
p tellinghuisen
Owner Response: Pat, thank you for bringing this to our attention. We are sending you out new beads to use in your kit. We have notified our manufacturer, and he is working on a solution.

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Density
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jun 8, 2012
Kids love hands on science and with this hands on model they not only learn but get to experience science! That's what makes them eager young scientists! Thanks so much!
Susan

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Easy and fun!
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon May 23, 2012
My students enjoyed this experiment. It's a great way to show how you can used a liquid to separate plastic of different densities. Some of my students found the last separation to be difficult because they would not take the time to allow the salt to dissolve into solution! Therefore, it was a good reminder of taking time to correctly perform experiments and get repeatable results!
Donna Brown

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eduacator
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon May 19, 2012
A great activity that is simple to set up, engaging, and reusable. My 3rd- 5th graders really enjoyed trying to figure out why this happened.
Mark Everson

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Science Coach
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon May 16, 2012
Great hands-on activity to show separation by density.
maggie johnston

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NGSS

This product will support your students' understanding of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)*, as shown in the table below.

Elementary Middle School High School

2-PS1-1

Students can use the Mixture Separation Challenge in an investigation to describe and classify different kinds of materials by their observable properties.

2-PS1-2

Students can analyze data obtained from testing the Mixture Separation Challenge to determine which materials have the properties that are best suited for an intended purpose.

5-PS1-1

Students can use the Mixture Separation Challenge in an investigation to develop a model to describe that matter is made of particles too small to be seen.

5-PS1-3

Students can make observations and measurements of the different materials in the Mixture Separation Challenge to identify materials based on their properties.

MS-PS1-1

Students can use the Mixture Separation Challenge in an investigation to develop models to describe the atomic composition of simple molecules and extended structures.

HS-PS1-1

Students can use the Mixture Separation Challenge in an investigation to predict properties of elements. Students can use the Periodic Table as a model to predict the relative properties of elements based on the patterns of electrons in the outermost energy level of atoms.

HS-PS2-6

Students can use the Mixture Separation Challenge in an investigation to communicate scientific and technical information about why the molecular-level structure is important in the functioning of designed materials.

Suggested Science Idea(s)

ALL Levels

This Mixture Separation Challenge is an excellent demonstration for density, solubility, and the salting effect. Students will be amazed by the actions of the beads. Due to the unexpected results in the beaker, secondary students have to use science to dissect an explanation for the layering. Great inquiry opportunities for all students. Some teachers never give away the secret.

2-PS1-1
2-PS1-2
5-PS1-1
5-PS1-3
MS-PS1-1
HS-PS1-1
HS-PS2-6

Students can use the Mixture Separation Challenge in an investigation of density. Mix table salt and water in a beaker, students are asked to develop a method for separating this mixture of four different small plastic beads. Advanced students can continue on to determine the density of each different polymer.

 

* NGSS is a registered trademark of Achieve. Neither Achieve nor the lead states and partners that developed the Next Generation Science Standards were involved in the production of, and do not endorse, this product.

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