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Mirascope NGSS

SKU #MIR-135
Availability: In Stock
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Project a real image that you can put your finger through.

Description

Project a real image that you can put your finger through. Using two concave, parabolic mirrors, a small object placed on the bottom appears to be floating as if real. A finger can pass right through it! A laser light even appears to bounce off the image! Visible 360 degrees! While not as big as our larger mirage, it is impressive! Includes a plastic frog. 15 cm (6") dia.

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Reviews

7 reviews
Excellent
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jun 3, 2018
I always have this out on my desk and my students are always surprised when they look at it. A good conversation starter for reflection.
Chris

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Love it!
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Apr 6, 2017
It is so simple and yet it encourages deep thinking. My kids love to play with it and it is inexpensive enough for me to let them explore.
Amy

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NJAAPT gift
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Aug 31, 2016
The NJAAPT has purchased these mirascopes as one of the many handouts to Physics teachers who will attend our December 3rd workshop.
James S. Signorelli

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Amaze
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Apr 25, 2016
Put this on the corner of your desk and watch them come close, closer and then they'll try to touch it. Lots of smiles and the hypotheses will flow.
KGiesler

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mirascope
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon May 29, 2012
When I was looking for this particular item, I was willing to pay about 30 dollars, you had two options one for 7 and one for 35. I think I should have bought the $35 because I think it could have been better quality or bigger so I regret not buying what I had in mind from the first place.
Jorge Martinez

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Great Purchase
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon May 23, 2012
I though this product was a very good purchase. My students were fascinated by the hologram produced and immediately wanted to know how it worked. It is a great hook for a lesson on mirrors and light. I recommend putting using a quarter instead of the frog with the kit. The illusion is much more effective.
Kimberly Mecir

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virtual image generator
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon May 17, 2012
This toy captures the imagination and attention of students easily. It illustrates virtual images in a manner that students will remember.
Nina Daye

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NGSS

This product will support your students' understanding of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)*, as shown in the table below.

Elementary Middle School High School

1-PS4-3

Students can use the Mirascope to conduct an investigation of how different materials affect the path of light.

MS-PS4-2

Students can use the Mirascope to develop and use a model to describe how waves are reflected, absorbed, or transmitted through various materials.

HS-PS4-1

Students can use this Mirascope to conduct investigations about technological devices use the principles of wave behavior and wave interactions with matter to transmit.

Suggested Science Idea(s)

1-PS4-3
MS-PS4-2
HS-PS4-1

Students use the Mirascope to test the Law of Reflection by shining a flashlight or laser at an angle through the opening. It also uses the Law of Reflection to create a 3D instant hologram when a small solid object is placed inside the Mirascope mirror chamber. Amazingly, when a laser light is directed at the hologram, it appears to bounce off the image, yet a finger can pass through the image.

 

* NGSS is a registered trademark of Achieve. Neither Achieve nor the lead states and partners that developed the Next Generation Science Standards were involved in the production of, and do not endorse, this product.

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