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Kiko.893 Robot NGSS

SKU #ROB-585
Availability: In Stock
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Budding engineers will love Kiko.893 - an infrared-sensor-detecting, obstacle-exploring robot. Students first need to build this 107-piece snap-together robot before letting Kiko.893 loose to roam.

Description

Budding engineers will love Kiko.893 - an infrared-sensor-detecting, obstacle-exploring robot. Students first need to build this 107-piece snap-together robot before letting Kiko.893 loose to roam. This adorable little guy has two pre-programmed modes (Follow-Me and Explore) and plenty of sound and light effects. Kiko.893 scans its surroundings by using AI (artificial intelligence), I/R (infrared sensor), and six legs which allow it to turn 360 degrees and seamlessly avoid obstacles. Create a maze or just let Kiko.893 follow you around! For ages 8+. Requires 4 AAA batteries (not included). Dimensions of assembled product: 4.96" x 5.43" x 6.49"

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NGSS

This product will support your students' understanding of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)*, as shown in the table below.

Suggested Science Idea(s)

1-PS4-3
1-PS4-4
K-2-ETS1-2
K-2-ETS1-3
4-PS4-1
4-PS4-3
3-5-ETS1-2
3-5-ETS1-3
MS-PS4-2
MS-PS4-3
MS-ETS1-3
MS-ETS1-4
HS-PS4-3
HS-PS4-4
HS-PS4-5
HS-ETS1-2
HS-ETS1-4

The Kiko Robot is an amazing teaching tool to tap into learners' curiosity about engineering, motion, infrared waves and Artificial Intelligence. Building the robot allows students to examine the individual components of the whole robot.

There are two preprogrammed behaviors: 'Follow Me' and 'Explore', which allow young learners to observe and make predictions.

Building a maze invites all types of learning possibilities. Kiko Robot exhibits Artificial Intelligence as it interprets obstacles in its way.

Students of all ages can investigate how to interrupt the infrared light beam. This gives students the hands-on opportunity to learn more about the Electromagnetic Spectrum. Infrared Radiation (IR), sometimes referred to Infrared Light, are longer wavelengths than those of visible light. These wavelengths are generally invisible to the human eye.

Students can use a variety of materials such as paper, mirror, or clear Plexiglas to study how the robot's behavior changes as its infrared sensors interacts with matter.

 

* NGSS is a registered trademark of Achieve. Neither Achieve nor the lead states and partners that developed the Next Generation Science Standards were involved in the production of, and do not endorse, this product.

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