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Gas Solubility Demonstration ("The Baby Bottle Experiment") NGSS

SKU #BOT-815
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Great for teaching Henry's Law of Partial Pressures.

Description

An unopened can of soda feels very solid because more than three volumes of dissolved carbon dioxide gas create a pressure of about 55 PSI above the liquid. This is about four times atmospheric pressure. Fill a baby bottle with soda, secure with a rubber nipple without a hole, and shake. Watch the nipple expand as the gas comes out of solution. Amazing to see! Great for teaching Henry's Law of Partial Pressures. Includes baby bottle, two rubber nipples without holes, and instructions. Designs may vary.

Video

Lesson Ideas

Download the pdf of this lesson!

When a bottle with liquid is shaken, the rubber top expands.

Materials:
2 hard plastic 8 oz baby bottles, and
4 rubber nipples w/o holes.

Procedure:
Fill a baby bottle with soda (pour soda slowly, so as not to produce a 'head') and securely attach the top using a rubber nipple without a hole. Shake and observe.

Additional Investigations:

  1. Repeat the procedure with two baby bottles at the same time, one containing cold soda and one containing the same volume of soda at room temperature.
  2. Observe what happens when the baby bottle with an expanded nipple is placed in an ice water bath and shaken.
  3. Does it matter if the bottle is completely filled with soda to start or only partially filled? At what point do you see a difference?
  4. Do different types of soda give different results?
  5. Can you design and make an apparatus to quantitatively measure the expansion of the rubber nipple?
  6. What happens when a Mentos tablet is attached to the inside of the nipple, the top secured, and the Mentos tablet allowed to fall into the soda? Are there other materials that will cause this change?

Explanation:
An unopened can or plastic bottle of soda feels solid because of the more than 3 volumes of dissolved carbon dioxide gas creating a pressure as much as 55 PSI above the liquid. This is about 4 times atmospheric pressure.

When soda is opened, we hear the noise of the escaping compressed gas. In an open container, most of the dissolved gas in the soda is released into the atmosphere and the soda eventually tastes 'flat'. However, if the container is immediately resealed after opening, as is the case with the baby bottle, the pressure above the soda builds up until a new equilibrium pressure is established. The equilibrium pressure is enough to expand the rubber nipple significantly. It is amazing to see!

The demonstration can be used to teach that the solubility of a gas decreases with increasing temperature. In fact, a gas has zero solubility at the boiling point of a liquid. At normal atmospheric pressure this is 100oC for water. This explains why chlorinated water is often boiled and allowed to cool before adding to a fish tank. The process removes the dissolved chlorine gas, Cl2.

The solubility of a gas decreasing with increasing temperature is of great concern because it is directly related to global warming. The higher the temperature; the less dissolved oxygen in the earth's water supply! This greatly affects aquatic life. Of equal concern is the vast amounts of carbon dioxide being released into the atmosphere from the ocean, causing even higher temperatures due to the Greenhouse Effect. Already we are observing a loss of coral reefs, which are largely made up of carbonates. The result is more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. In 1972, Professor George Whitesides, Professor of Chemistry at Harvard University, predicted 'we are rapidly bringing the temperature of the earth to the melting point of lead'. Thirty-five years later global warming has become of great concern! Much of global warming can be related to the decreasing solubility of gas as the temperature increases.

Note: This demonstration was first observed at one the early CHEM ED Conferences in Canada in the 1970's.

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Reviews

4 reviews
It's Great!
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Feb 24, 2016
I ordered these for the 2nd grade team in my building and the students absolutely loved it! The teachers have made this experiment a staple in their instruction for years to come! :)
Renita Upshur

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easy to use
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Oct 16, 2014
Easy to use, went over well with the kids. It is something even the youngest can have fun with as long as they can shake a bottle.
Paula

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The Students Love This
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Apr 16, 2014
I am very pleased with this purchase. Works great for my workshop that accompanies my science show for elementary schools.
Dennis Regling

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Great!
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jun 9, 2013
Perfect experiment for the classroom. Thank you!!!
Lynn

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NGSS

This product will support your students' understanding of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)*, as shown in the table below.

Elementary Middle School High School

5-PS1-3

Students can use this experiment to make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties.

3-5-ETS1-3

Students can use this experiment to plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

MS-PS1-2

Using this experiment, students can to analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and after the substances interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred.

MS-ETS-3

Students can use this experiment to analyze data from tests to determine similarities and differences among several design solutions to identify the best characteristics of each that can be combined into a new solution to better meet the criteria for success.

HS-PS1-2

Using this experiment, students can construct and revise an explanation for the outcome of a simple chemical reaction based on the outermost electron states of atoms, trends in the periodic table, and knowledge of the patterns of chemical properties.

HS-ETS1.B

Developing Possible Solutions. Both Physical models and computers can be used in various ways to aid in the engineering process.

Suggested Science Idea(s)

5-PS1-3
MS-PS1-2
HS-PS1-2

Students can use this experiment to plan and conduct an investigation to describe and classify different kinds of materials by their observable properties.

 

* NGSS is a registered trademark of Achieve. Neither Achieve nor the lead states and partners that developed the Next Generation Science Standards were involved in the production of, and do not endorse, this product.

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