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Colors in Motion NGSS

SKU #DEN-425
Availability: In Stock
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Not shipped outside the USA
A colorful way to demonstrate density.

Description

A colorful way to demonstrate density. This tabletop device has four chambers, each filled with a different colored liquid. Flip it over, and the colors will start to switch places, without mixing! Magic or density? Demonstrates density, color mixing, and insolubility. Colors may vary. 13.3 cm (5.25") tall.

This item is not available for International Shipping, and will be removed from any International orders.

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7 reviews
Students are Fascinated
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Feb 14, 2019
My students are fascinated with this. They constantly want to turn it over and play with it. It even has a calming effect on some of them. I wish I could afford one for every child. :-)
Vera Daniels

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colors in motion
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Aug 16, 2015
Students love trying to determine how this works. Great inquiry approach!
patricia judd

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Colors In Motion
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jul 14, 2015
Students remark on all my colorful gadgets and are mystified as to the background to how each item works. Truly I believe they just like to handle it but they do communicate with each other over what they see. That's always amazing.
Judith Denise Ashworth

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colors in motion
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Nov 22, 2014
I love it!
jill rockwood

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Middle School Science Teacher
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Oct 1, 2014
In talking about density at school, we build a density column with different liquids. The kids love to do this. The density viewer I bought is an extension of that and one the kids find fascinating to watch.
Verla Harmston

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Students Love This!
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon May 17, 2012
This is an inexpensive density demo item that students love. I have one on my desk and students can't leave it alone. It generates a lot of discussion and questions!
Rebecca Buzzell

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Great product
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon May 16, 2012
I have used this as a "warm up" activity for 2 years now with my 7th graders during our density unit. Students love watching it and are pleased that they can describe how it works!
K. Evans

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NGSS

This product will support your students' understanding of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)*, as shown in the table below.

Elementary Middle School High School

1-PS4-3

Students can use the Colors in Motion to conduct an investigation to determine the effect of placing objects made from different materials in the path of a beam of light.

2-PS1-1

Students can use the Colors in Motion in an investigation to describe and classify different kinds of materials by their observable properties.

5-PS1-1

Students can use the Colors in Motion in an investigation to develop a model to describe that matter is made of particles too small to be seen.

MS-PS1-1

Students can use the Colors in Motion in an investigation to develop models to describe the atomic composition of simple molecules and extended structures.

MS-PS4-2

Students can use the Colors in Motion in an investigation to develop and use a model to describe that waves are reflected, absorbed, or transmitted through various materials.

HS-PS2-6

Students can use the Colors in Motion in an investigation to communicate scientific and technical information about why the molecular-level structure is important in the functioning of designed materials.

HS-PS4-3

Students can use the Colors in Motion in an investigation to evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning behind the idea that electromagnetic radiation can be described by either a wave model or a particle model, and that for some situations one model is more useful than the other one.

Suggested Science Idea(s)

1-PS4-3
MS-PS4-2

Students can use the Colors in Motion as part of an investigation to determine the effect of placing objects made from different materials in the path of a beam of light. A strong flashlight will reveal interesting patterns as the two liquids move down the columns.

2-PS1-1
5-PS1-1
MS-PS1-1
HS-PS2-6

Students can use the Colors in Motion as a demo an investigation of different types of matter and their properties.

HS-PS4-3

Students can use the Colors in Motion in an investigation to evaluate the claims, evidence, and reasoning behind the idea that electromagnetic radiation can be better described in the wave model with this apparatus.

 

* NGSS is a registered trademark of Achieve. Neither Achieve nor the lead states and partners that developed the Next Generation Science Standards were involved in the production of, and do not endorse, this product.

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