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3-2-1 Blast Off! Kit NGSS

SKU #PHY-321
Availability: In Stock
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Everything you need to teach forces and energy.

Description

Our 3-2-1 Blast Off! workshop on forces and energy has become a standing-room-only event at NSTA conferences. Over the years, hundreds of teachers have asked us to develop a kit that bundles our much-loved demonstrations of things that go "bump" in the day! Kit includes comprehensive teaching instructions and enough hands-on components for up to 10 students. (Safety glasses recommended.) We've also created memory-refresher videos that walk you through each of the demonstrations, so you'll be up to speed and ready to Blast Off in just minutes!

Kit includes:
  • 10 Dropper Poppers
  • 10 ping pong balls
  • 5 Reaction Rockets
  • 1 Seismic Accelerator
  • 40 Rocket Balloons and Pump
  • 12 Bo!nks
  • 5 Mighty Seltzer Rockets
  • Extensive Lessons
  • Student Worksheets

Covers these topics:
  • Law of Conservation of Energy
  • Potential and Kinetic Energy
  • Newton's Laws of Motion
  • Working with Variables

Video




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Reviews

2 reviews
Great Activities!
Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Jul 27, 2016
This kit had numerous activities to work with. The kids had a blast learning each of the activities. This is a great hands-on approach to Newton's Laws of Motion.
Adrienne Scott

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Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Review star icon Apr 7, 2016
We have not yet used these items, we will be implementing them in our afterschool program .
Cheryl

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NGSS

This product will support your students' understanding of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS)*, as shown in the table below.

Elementary Middle School High School

K-PS2-1

Students can use the Dropper Popper to plan and conduct an investigation to compare the effects of different strengths or different directions of pushes and pulls on the motion of an object.

2-PS1-2

Rocket Balloons and the Mighty Seltzer Rocket can be loaded with air to investigate movement. Students can analyze data obtained from testing different materials to determine which materials have the properties that are best suited for an intended purpose.

4-PS3-4

Students can use the Dropper Popper, Reaction Rocket, and Bo!nks to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another.

3-5-ETS1-3

Students can use the Dropper Popper, Reaction Rocket, and Bo!nks to plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

K-PS2-2

Students can use the Reaction Rocket, Rocket Balloons, and the Mighty Seltzer Rocket in an investigation to explore flight and analyze data to determine if a design solution works as intended to change the speed and direction of an object with a push or a pull.

K-2-ETS1-1

Students can use the Reaction Rocket to plan an investigation to ask questions, make observations, and gather information about a situation people want to change to define a simple problem that can be solved through the development of a new or improved object or tool.

K-2-ETS1-2

Students can use the Reaction Rocket to develop a simple sketch, drawing, or physical model to illustrate how the shape of an object helps it function as needed to solve a given problem.

K-2-ETS1-3

Students can use the Reaction Rocket in an investigation to utilize engineering skills and proper testing methods of materials and design.

3-PS2-2

Students can make observations and/or measurements of the Reaction Rocket, Rocket Balloons, and the Mighty Seltzer Rocket flights in an investigation Students can utilize an object's motion to provide evidence that a pattern can be used to predict future motion.

3-5-ETS1-1
3-5-ETS1-2
3-5-ETS1-3

Students can use the Reaction Rocket in an investigation to plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

MS-PS3-5

Students can use the Dropper Popper, Reaction Rocket, and Bo!nks to construct, use and present arguments or experiments to support the claim that when the motion energy of an object changes, energy is transferred to or from the object.

MS-ETS1-4

Students can use the Dropper Popper, Reaction Rocket, and Bo!nks to develop a model or experiment to generate data for iterative testing and modification of a proposed object, tool, or process such that an optimal design can be achieved.

MS-PS2-2

Students can use the Reaction Rocket, Rocket Balloons, and the Mighty Seltzer Rocket to plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object's motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object.

MS-ETS1-4

Students can utilize the Reaction Rocket as a prototype to develop a model to generate data for interactive testing and modification of a proposed object, tool, or process such that an optimal design can be achieved.

HS-PS3-4

Students can use the Dropper Popper, Reaction Rocket, and Bo!nks to design, build, and refine a device that works within given constraints to convert one form of energy into another form of energy.

HS-ETS1-2

Students can use Reaction Rocket and Bo!nks in an investigation to design a solution to a complex real-world problem by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering.

HS-PS2-1

Students can use the Reaction Rocket and Rocket Balloons to plan a flight investigation to gather scientific evidence. Students can analyze data to support the claim that Newton's second law of motion describes the mathematical relationship among the net force on a macroscopic object, its mass, and its acceleration.

HS-ETS1-2

Students can use the Reaction Rocket as a prototype in an investigation to provide evidence that students will use to modify a rocket. Students-can design a solution to a complex real-world problem by breaking it down into smaller, more manageable problems that can be solved through engineering.

HS-ETS1-4

Students can use the Reaction Rocket to plan a flight investigation that includes the use of computer simulation to model the impact of proposed solutions to a complex real-world problem with numerous criteria and constraints on interactions within and between systems relevant to the problem.

HS-PS1-4

The Mighty Seltzer Rocket can be loaded with Alka-Seltzer tablets and water to develop a model to illustrate that the release or absorption of energy from a chemical reaction system depends on the changes in total bond energy.

Suggested Science Idea(s)

K-PS2-1
3-5-ETS1-3
4-PS3-4
MS-PS3-5
MS-ETS1-4
HS-PS3-4

Using a Dropper Popper in combination with a ping pong ball creates a dramatic demonstration of energy transfer—and much more.

Students will get a blast out of launching rockets with the Reaction Rocket A classroom/wind free environment is all you need to start flying.

The Reaction Rocket presents a simple and dramatic demonstration of energy transfer

Students can explore all of Newton's laws of motion, energy transfer, aerodynamics, and more. Students can use the rocket as a prototype, for future engineering investigations

The Reaction Rocket uses gravity for its initial motion and the transfer of elastic potential energy to propel the rocket. Allow students to design and manipulate variables such as drop height and launch surface to explore many facets of flight, force and motion.

Encourage students to utilize mathematical equations in their investigations for flight and landing proximity. Set up height measurements and targets for criteria based hands-on learning.

An interesting element to introduce into the lessons and investigations is the use of the slow motion video option on many phones. The slow action will allow students to look more closely at the forces during an investigation. Students can utilize the stop action on the video to collect precise data/measurements to identify parts of flight.

Private industry is now the guiding force in the United States space program. Challenge students to research current space programs and then come up with their own real world problems that need engineering solutions. Enable students to break down the flight tasks to embark on their own Reaction Rocket mission.

In order for a rocket to be stable, the center of gravi

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